1. A WombatDialer roadmap - reverse dialing, AMD/fax detection and more

    We have been quite busy working on a number of themes that will make WombatDialer better and more useful, so we thought we’d better share them with you.

    Busy Wombat

    The first theme we have addressed is improved flexibility in dialing to agents. A number of users asked for ways for agents to be already connected when the callee is rung. This led to the developement of Reverse Dialing and Reverse Stepwise Dialing. With Reverse Dialing, the agent is rung first and then the call is attempted. This makes sure that when the callee answers, the agent is already on-line and ready to talk. The agent must be a member of an Asterisk queue, so that we get presence information (log in, log out, pauses and current status) right out of Asterisk. This also lets you share an agent on multiple queues with different dialing policies.

    With Reverse Stepwise Dialing, we go a bit further - we use an API so that an agent can reserve a call, preview it and decide whether to actually dial it or to mark it as processed without dialing. If the agent does not want the call processed, you can reschedule it or mark it as not to be processed. If the agent does not make a decision within 10 minutes from reserving, the call is put back into the dialing pool. All call variables are passed to the agent, so you can display them or link to an external CRM.

    The second theme is security - we are adding a security model that matches the one used by QueueMetrics, so that you can make different trunks, end-points, campaigns and list visible to some users only. This also affects Live viewing and campaign reporting and will make WombatDialer completely multi-tenant (like QueueMetrics is).

    After this, we plan to address two major themes - AMD/Fax detection and Black lists / Robinson lists. For AMD/Fax, we plan to use the facilities Asterisk offers in order to detect whether the call is answered by an Answering Machine or by a fax machine. This has the major advantage of not tying you to a specific solution, but lets you use a plethora of third party modules that are available for Asterisk in case you should find the default ones not good enough for you. WombatDialer will run the channel detection scripts and will react by sending either a pre-recorded message (for AMD) or a fax page in case no human caller is detected.

    As per black lists, we plan to offer both a way to check numbers against a set of internal lists or against an external server using an API. A number will be checked against all lists for a campaign and will be processed only if all call lists allow it.

    We plan to release the first two features - Reverse and Reverse Stepwise - in about one week. Work is already ongoing for security, so this should be available in 0.7.0 by the end of June. AMD/Fax and black lists will be implemented by the end of the summer - as they in the planning stage, we would like to hear from you about what you would need. We have a Sugegstions forum on UserEcho at http://wombatdialer.userecho.com where you can propose new improvements and vote on what other people proposed, so make sure your voice is heard.

    (Source: wombatdialer.com)

     
  2. Version 0.6.13 - A taste of things to come

    We have a new version of WombatDialer available on the public repo. This version adds a few interesting things to WombatDialer and should make your life easier when running it in production.

    First, WombatDialer has a better status view of queues: it now prints out the agents present on a queue and their current state, plus the calls (if any) currently queued.

    New dialer status

    This way it is easier to understand what is going on in real-time. Also, when a call is connected to an agent, the agent being used is shown on the Live page. WombatDialer also tries to sync the queue as soon as it is brought up, so you always see all queues for your running campaigns even if you restart the dialer.

    The second major change is that call lists are now dynamic. You can pause and add lists on running campaigns, and WombatDialer will immediately respond to the changes you make.

    List manager

    You can even add lists to idle campaigns, and they will start dialing immediately. For each list, the current high-water mark is displayed. The Live page also includes a check so that you cannot send commands to the dialer if the dialer is currently down.

    One last important change is that the infamous DTSC bug was fixed, so you do not need to restart the dialer multiple times. This will make installation of the system easier.

    We look forward to your comments - we have a feedback system available at http://wombatdialer.userecho.com so the community can propose new features and discuss them before we implement them. And do not forget to follow us on Twitter or Facebook so you can be updated when we have something new for you!

     
  3. Tutorial: WombatDialer and PIAF

    It is quite easy to install WombatDialer on PBX-in-a-Flash in order to give it autodialer, voice broadcasting and progressive dialing capabilities. This was tested on PIAF 1.7.5.6.1

    Before we start, it is important to notice that there is no need to run WD on the same box your PBX is running. As WombatDialer relies exclusively on AMI, you would be likely better off (at least when experimenting) to set up a virtual box based on CentOS 6, install WombatDialer there and connect remotely to PIAF (or any other PBX). You will just need to create a special AMI user on your PBX allowing remote connection (see below).

    If you want to install it on the PIAF system, here is what you would do:

    • Add the Loway repos

      wget -P /etc/yum.repos.d http://yum.loway.ch/loway.repo

    • Install WombatDialer automatically using yum

      yum install wombat

    • For the moment, stop iptables, or you won’t be able to connect remotely

      /etc/init.d/iptables stop

    Of course you would not want to run a production system with iptables off, so just add a rule allowing access to port 8080 from your workstations.

    • Finish the installation using your browser

    Now open your browser and go to:

    http://server:8080/wombat/

    It will get you to a page that will prompt for database creation. This will create a db called “wombat” and will fill it in with initial data.

    When asked, remember that the default MySQL root password for PIAF is “passw0rd”.

    After this, it may need to update the database. Will take only a few seconds (this step might not be necessary - depends on the version of WD you are installing).

    Then, you will be shown the license agreement. Approve it (but read it first!)

    Now you can log in as “demoadmin” password “demo”.

    As a first thing, you’ll have to tell WombatDialer to which server to connect to. If you connect via AMI to the local system, you can use default AMI user “admin” password “amp111”. If you installed WD on a different system, you need to create a AMI user that will allow remote connection - edit /etc/asterisk/manager_custom.conf to add it. At this point you should really have a look at the Getting Started Guide.

    Now that WombatDialer is installed, you should look around on this blog to see many different things you can do with it. If you’d like to try automated queue call-backs, see http://blog.wombatdialer.com/post/41774590472/autorecall - the source script can be found at https://github.com/Loway/WombatDialerExamples.

    Happy hacking!